Month: January 2022

Digital health must leverage AI, chatbot, and data analytics technologies to understand patient propensities.

Season 4: Episode #108

Podcast with Ryan Younger, VP of Marketing, Virtua Health

"Digital health must leverage AI, chatbot, and data analytics technologies to understand patient propensities."

paddy Hosted by Paddy Padmanabhan
To receive regular updates 

In this podcast, Ryan Younger, VP of Marketing at Virtua Health, discusses the consumer-driven era of healthcare, emerging digital health technologies, and why active listening to the consumers at every phase is crucial. Virtua is a leading New Jersey-based not-for-profit healthcare system that operates a network of hospitals, surgery centers, and physician practices.

Digital health tools like AI, chatbots, and leveraging data and analytics capabilities assist clinical leaders in understanding patients’ propensity. Ryan identifies insights in business, identifies channels for growth, and indicates why marketing will always be a critical organizational function that binds people and drives digital engagement. Take a listen.

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Show Notes

01:13Tell us about Virtua Health, your role, and the digital transformation journey.
02:26How has your role evolved since the pandemic, and what are your priorities for 2022?
03:57How is Virtua Health addressing the changing expectations in a consumer-driven era of healthcare?
05:57 How do you research these preferences? Can you talk about some of the things you’ve done to look at what your patient populations are specifically looking for?
09:37 Can you share one or two nuggets of insights that you've gained over the last year, which is driving your marketing programs?
13:16 How are you deploying CRM and where does it fit in your digital engagement goals?
14:52 How do you leverage the data? How do you make the connection from an infrastructure and data analytics standpoint to drive this service line strategy?
16:30 What are the two to three things you see across healthcare that they're all focused on? What will be the big themes in 2022?
18:16 There are so many non-traditional players in the health care services space now. What do you think really differentiates a traditional health system like yours in the eyes of your target population?
19:50 How can your peers raise their profile or visibility and highlight its importance in the digital era?
21:19 What are the important technologies that you think will drive the marketing function in the future?

About our guest

Ryan Younger, VP of Marketing at Virtua Health has worked in health care for three well-known organizations. He has been a frequent speaker on driving revenue growth strategies, connecting marketing technology, consumer insights and brand. Currently, he is vice president of marketing at Virtua Health, the leading health system in southern New Jersey.

Q: Ryan, tell us about Virtua Health, your role there and the digital transformation journey.

Ryan: We’re a medium-sized health system in southern New Jersey with about 300 locations including the hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and urgent-care physician offices. Our mission is to help people be well, get well, and stay well.

Q: Tell us what your role as VP-Marketing, entails.

Ryan: My role entails a little bit of everything within the team – from managing the brand, creative strategy, analytics, digital to a plethora of areas across the organization where I work with people on experience, recruitment, philanthropy and support both, operations and the clinical aspect. It’s expansive and keeps me going.

Q: Quite the comprehensive role but how has it evolved since the pandemic and what are your priorities for 2022?

Ryan: Some of the changes that are on the horizon or have happened during the pandemic were certainly there, before. People have spoken about how much these got accelerated. Virtua Health’s always played a critical role in intra-organization communications with research and insights, creative strategy, and content development. We continue to grow in influence in terms of how much the organization is counting now on strategy, digital health, change management, peoples’ experiences, and how we can influence it.

This year too, we hope to extend our influence across areas — digital transformation, building that brand and content strategy. Since the past three years that I’ve been at Virtua, one of our three strategic goals has been orienting to the consumer and that’s driven us. That will continue into 2022.

Q: Healthcare has never been really known as a consumer-focused industry up until relatively recently. So, how is Virtua Health addressing these changing expectations in a consumer-driven era of healthcare?

Ryan: It stems from the leadership understanding that to succeed we must be close to the consumer. That is one of our three organizational goals, and it helps us address changing expectations. With regard to expectations, some of that has to do with generations — new generations accessing more healthcare.

If we think about the millennials, the oldest there have hit age 40 now, and they have families, are homeowners as well, so we can’t use that term to imply they’re young people. They want things when they want it, and they certainly have considerable resources at their fingertips, so, they’re empowered, and the expectation is they’ll influence decision-making. They might not go through a primary care physician for all their healthcare. Instead, they may switch to an app or a digital mechanism or urgent care. So that consumer push has been here for a while with people looking for convenience and access and just different expectations around greater value being assigned to time. We’re all busy people, not just the doctors and that influences many areas.

Q: How do you research these preferences? Can you talk about some of the things you’ve done to look at what your patient populations are specifically looking for?

Ryan: I’m glad you mentioned that because it’s definitely all ages that research their options. Our seniors are more tech savvy than they’re given credit for. As for our strategies for research, we just actively listen to our consumers at every phase. We’ve also built a Community Insights Panel, which now comprises over 30,000 people and that’s where we ask them about preferences, how they feel about different services we offer or how they make decisions, and what’s important to them. We tap that group a lot as well.

Q: You have the panel offering feedback, then you action that via some digital health program which is a way to meet the patient where they want to be met. Since these days, it’s all online, how do you pull a program like this together within an organization? How do you bring together the Infrastructure, IT, contact centre, marketing, partners to align and serve patients’ needs?

Ryan: All these areas you’ve mentioned are important. We try to be that voice of the customer and talk about what we’re hearing, seeing, and what our customers are telling us. So, whether that’s patients to clinicians, employees to HR, or customers to the access center, we try to bring that message forward and remove some of our subjectivity. If all of us align along a particular goal, we’ll talk about testing what works – this creative or that or whether this message resonates more than the other. We put that right into the field – an email, a digital ad – and check what gets people to the action that we want and just maximize from there. That’s an effective way of aligning people with one goal — when you put the needs of the customer first, and make it about the data, that’s what gets us there.

Q: Can you share one or two nuggets of insights that you’ve gained over the last year, which is driving your marketing programs, perhaps something that came to you as a surprise?

Ryan: Sure, I’ll mention two. Everyone knows a lot about the pandemic and the long-haulers or people with long-haul symptoms. We were trying to launch a service around the long-haul effects that people were having. We wanted to see if people understood what it would do, how they’d access it, what’d make it valuable to them.

We’ve learned this in some other areas that language makes a difference. People don’t want to be identified by their disease if they’re long-haulers, and that became very clear. So, when we launched the service, we called it Care After COVID, which was just another way of looking at it. It’s descriptive enough so people didn’t wonder what it was. It looked at things a little differently and that’s an example of something where we asked people and figured out what would work best.

Another instance would be just how we learn about behaviour. We all know this intuitively, but one thing that we were able to test in our CRM system was how to get people to move towards action? If we could understand the health services they might need, how do we connect them to those? What we wanted to learn was how many rounds of communication it’d take? So, we always got the best and the largest number of people to act upon the first time we reached out. We talked about the power of the nudge – where if you talk to people that second, third, fourth time, they’d be four times more likely to use the service intended for them. While we weren’t surprised that we needed to do that, we learned a lot about the number and the type of communications to be used.

Q: You mentioned CRM. Many health systems are investing in it now and there’s so much you can do with it. How are you deploying CRM technology and where does it fit in your digital health engagement goals?

Ryan: One of the most important areas that we’re tying it is in our service-line strategy. We’re analyzing patients’ health propensities for different diseases –heart, cancer, orthopedics — and trying to figure out how best to connect them to these services. They may not want to hear about Cancer for instance, but they should know that they need to get connected early on to a mammogram and empower themselves to think about prevention. If something does come around after all, at least they catch it early. It’s the same with heart disease. We use CRM to help us understand those propensities and to predict the types of services people will need. That enables us to talk to them, strategically, in a more personalized way since we know who they are and what may interest them. That service line strategy has been important to us.

Q: How do you leverage the data? You’re obviously looking into EHRs, so, how do you make the connection from an infrastructure and data analytics standpoint to drive this service line strategy?

Ryan: It starts certainly with talking to the clinical leadership since they know their patients best. Then, we understand who we need to reach and why. As we do that, we ensure the clinical leadership knows we have all this patient data that’s anonymous to us. I may be looking at John Smith for example, but to me he’s just person A who has this higher propensity. People have got excited about technology that makes us much more proactive for how to reach and connect with others. It’s AI-technology that’s driving all this. It’s much smarter than we are about how to reach people, identify them and make it relevant.

Then, there are the platforms, that carve out those audiences, create the right automation rules and reach the right people. If the users of these platforms answer one way, then, the platforms follow-up in a certain manner thus putting together their patient journey. It’s just so powerful in enabling us to understand people, enhancing personalization, enabling us to see how they act, what works, what doesn’t, and ensuring adjustments. Patient confidentiality is maintained all this while and while we don’t know who the patient is, we’re trying to make our information much more relevant to them. And that’s where our technology tools have helped.

Q: When you talk to your peers across healthcare, what are the 2-3 things that they’re all focused on? What will be the big themes in 2022?

Ryan: I think people are trying to make sure that they can be very targeted. The resources are scarce, and we’ll be held accountable to do more with less, so our ability to target and measure results is something everybody will be after. It isn’t always easy to do in healthcare, but we’ve got better at it. So that’s a big one.

I would say that brand is another for sure. During COVID, in a lot of ways, people got equalized as did healthcare organizations because COVID was not necessarily seen as expertise of one organization over another. So, you see people needing all these different healthcare domains now and that’s where the brand, and how it connects with them becomes relevant. The focus I think is re-energized in 2022 for a lot of people, so it will be competitive, and people will be making choices based on brand.

Q: The brand is an important concept because we are now in a competitive landscape that’s changing. There are so many non-traditional players in the healthcare services space — the national retailers, digital health start-ups, big technology firms trying to get into the primary care space. What do you think really differentiates a traditional health system like yours in the eyes of your target population?

Ryan: Great question. I think trust always gets up there to the top for me. We want to be that trusted partner because people do have access to a lot of different information. And to your point, the amount of capital flowing into healthcare from these companies, like Amazon and Apple is beyond what we’ve seen. There are so many entities in that primary care market on the retail side, but trust is an important one. We are more of a regional system, and so people tend to live and work in the same area. So, we’re among that community, hence, it’s a great opportunity to continue to build that trust. That’s always big for me.

I also think personalization is important since it ensures that your information is relevant to the right person at the right time. Those are certainly the two that come on top for me on brand.

Q: When your peers ask, “how do I get a seat at the table” today, if they’re not getting one, so to speak, what would be your advice to them? How can they raise the profile or the visibility of the function and highlight its importance in the digital era?

Ryan: I think more and more marketing has been able to get that seat at the table. I work with a lot of our colleagues nationwide and I think, they’re doing a fantastic job making a big impact on their organizations. For groups that are looking to be able to build that more, it’s to some degree a kind of leaning into that ability that marketing has and always does around connecting people, whether that’s within the organization or outside of it, that’s important. We’re influencing vision, strategy, business goals, and mission. So, we can always be a connector through all those seams. What we do well is understand our audience, whoever it is. So, we serve a lot of those needs and be that advocate.

For the consumer that is becoming more empowered, organizations realize that and so they ask more questions around how they can connect with that. So, leaning into that power of what we have and what we do should continue to build that influence that we’re looking for.

Q: From your perspective, what are the important technologies that you think are going to drive the marketing function going forward? You already talked about CRM. Are there others that come to mind?

Ryan: It’s a term that can be used very broadly, but Artificial Intelligence in general is driving so many things including our CRM and media-buying for instance. It drives our chatbot online and how we respond to consumers. So, that’s a big one that we’re trying to work with.

We’re also trying to figure out ways to build more texting capabilities into our pockets. How that integrates with platforms because it has become such a universal communications mechanism is amazing, but you must be careful here since not everyone wants to be texted. So that must be used appropriately. How we integrate that into our platforms is going to be important at a more granular tactical level. So, those are a couple that jump to mind.

We hope you enjoyed this podcast. Subscribe to our podcast series at  www.thebigunlock.com  and write to us at  info@thebigunlock.com

Disclaimer: This Q&A has been derived from the podcast transcript and has been edited for readability and clarity

About the host

Paddy is the co-author of Healthcare Digital Transformation – How Consumerism, Technology and Pandemic are Accelerating the Future (Taylor & Francis, Aug 2020), along with Edward W. Marx. Paddy is also the author of the best-selling book The Big Unlock – Harnessing Data and Growing Digital Health Businesses in a Value-based Care Era (Archway Publishing, 2017). He is the host of the highly subscribed The Big Unlock podcast on digital transformation in healthcare featuring C-level executives from the healthcare and technology sectors. He is widely published and has a by-lined column in CIO Magazine and other respected industry publications.

RPM can enable better access and enhance the standard of care to those who have the hardest time receiving it

Season 4: Episode #107

Podcast with Lucienne Ide, M.D., PH.D., Founder and CEO, Rimidi

"RPM can enable better access and enhance the standard of care to those who have the hardest time receiving it"

paddy Hosted by Paddy Padmanabhan
To receive regular updates 

In this podcast, Dr. Lucienne Ide, Founder and CEO of Rimidi, acknowledges the rapidly evolving healthcare market and discusses her passion for making healthcare scalable and better for all stakeholders by leveraging the right tools, insights, and analytics needed at the points of care. Rimidi is a clinical management platform designed to optimize clinical workflows.  

Dr. Ide wears many hats – an executive, a physician-scientist, health IT enthusiast, entrepreneur, and problem-solver. She states why sustainable, innovative, and impactful solutions are crucial for chronic disease management and share some unique perspectives on how technology and policy need to align to extend care to those who have the hardest time receiving it. She also acknowledges reimbursement as one of the barriers in enabling digital health models at the point of care. Take a listen.

Our Podcast Partners:  

Show Notes

00:31Tell us about Rimidi and what led you to start it?
02:41What according to you is the current adoption rate for telehealth and RPM modalities? Specifically, for your platform which is in the RPM space?
05:24Who are your customers today and what is your ideal profile?
06:49 Can you give us an example of one of your clients who's used your platform and how do they derive value from it?
09:09 Data is at the core of how you deliver value. What were the challenges you had to overcome and what is the State of the Union on that?
15:29 How does a platform like yours address social equity and health equity disparities in access to care?
19:32 What are the big trends in digital healthcare and virtual care models in 2022? Can you share some of the goals for your company?
21:55 What are your thoughts on this whole explosive landscape of digital health funding that we have seen?

About our guest

Lucienne Marie Ide, M.D., PH.D., is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Rimidi, a cloud- based software platform that enables personalized management of health conditions across populations. She brings her diverse experiences in medicine, science, venture capital and technology to bear in leading Rimidi’s strategy and vision. Motivated by the belief that we can do so much better as individuals, in industry and society, Lucie left clinical medicine to join the ranks of healthcare entrepreneurs who are trying to revolutionize an industry.

Q. Tell us a bit about Rimidi. What led you to start it?

Lucie: Rimidi is an Atlanta, Georgia-based health IT company focused on providing tools to the healthcare provider market and helping clinicians make data-driven, personalized, proactive decisions about patient care.
I’m a clinician myself but I started my career in data working for the federal government. Then, I spent a little time in medicine. When I became a clinician, I thought I’d be an academic physician and have a long career, there. But I was really intrigued with the workflow and data challenges that clinicians faced and decided to leave clinical practice for what I could do on the technology and informatics side to make that better for clinicians and their patients.

Q. As a doctorpreneur who’s coming into technology with deep knowledge of clinical needs, combining both has got to be challenging. But, with telehealth, remote patient monitoring etc., becoming mainstream ideas today, what according to you is the current adoption rate for these modalities specifically for your platform which is in the remote patient monitoring space?

Lucie: It’s been an interesting two years due to COVID and its impact on healthcare delivery. Telehealth and remote patient monitoring have been some of the major accelerations. We have worked in this space for a long time — in terms of innovation years, where 6-8 years is a lifetime — and we’ve enabled the sort of continuous models of care as I call it, right from in-clinic to at-home and all the touchpoints in between because that’s what it takes to manage chronic health conditions.

A patient lives with hypertension and/or diabetes or heart failure, every day, not just the four days that they happen to have an appointment each year. So, that’s always made sense to us. But, there were barriers to that like reimbursement that obstructed scalability to a larger segment of the market. So, a lot was capitated at risk for groups engaged in those activities because they felt it was the right way to deliver patient care. Now, while the reimbursements weren’t new, the pandemic helped tear the band-aid off for everyone. Their hesitation around adopting this novel, whether it’s telemedicine or RPM and overcoming the fear of doing something new saw two camps being created — the risk bearing entities for whom this is the most cost-effective and efficient way to deliver good care and achieve their quality measures. And the groups, who still live in a very fee-for-service world that have really embraced the reimbursement which enables them to do this work and deliver high quality patient care. So it’s still kind of a split market in our experience with our customers divided into groups.

Q. Who are your customers today? What is your ideal profile and what kind of entities do you work with?

Lucie: We do work with the accountable care organizations that bear financial risk. While I agree that everything follows the money in healthcare, I often say that CMS created these reimbursement models as an on-ramp to value-based capitated kind of behaviours.

When we first launched into the ACA world, it was a bridge too far for so many organizations to go from their fee-for-service decades of behavior to becoming a risk-bearing capitated entity. We have clients who’re able to take advantage of the reimbursement because they still live in a fee-for-service, do their remote patient monitoring, and start behaving in this more proactive, comprehensive way of delivering healthcare.

Q. Give us an example of one of your clients who’s used your platform. How do they derive value from it? How are they paid for it? How does it work for a patient with a chronic condition like diabetes or hypertension? Walk us through this from your platform’s perspective and how you’re pulling it all together?

Lucie: We’re working with a group called Leon Medical Group there in the Miami market, South Florida, the Medicare Advantage Group. So, they survey the risk on their patient population and have an older polychronic population. They use our platform to help them manage diabetes among their patients. They undertake RPM with the connected Glucometer and the data collated is monitored by the care management team of pharmacists who are engaging with those patients, educating them, adjusting the medication as they monitor the blood glucose levels, while also intervening on the clinical side.

Since it’s RPM it’s not really a thing unto itself. It is a part of understanding what’s happening with this patient, how to manage a condition like diabetes, have they had all their screenings, are they on the right classes of medications to decrease their cardiovascular risk, are their blood glucose levels controlled and are these successfully decreasing their cardiovascular risk of complications?

They target variations for poorly controlled diabetes defined by an A1C over 9, and they’ve been able to get 88% of those patients to goal by engaging them more intensely through RPM, but also more holistically because the whole platform is integrated with their Epic EHRs and so, that paints a much more complete picture of what’s happening with that patient.

Q. Let’s talk about the data because that’s at the core of how you actually deliver value. It’s a challenge putting all the data into the system or wrangling it to make holistic sense of it. What were the challenges that you had to overcome? Is it still a work in progress? What’s the State of the Union on that?

Lucie: We have been very early evangelists of FHIR for the HL7 FHIR data standard because this was always the vision — how do we get all of this into that workflow to the point of care? None of us as physicians are begging for more data. What we want instead, is the insight, the curated information. So, the question is what is this data telling me? What’s the story? What do I need to do?
When I first started the company, FHIR had just turned 10 years old. It was more an academic-level project than one of commercial relevance. We’ve been on that journey of standardizing APIs and interoperability and FHIR has become the dominant standard as the company’s grown. That’s been an important part of our story because now, we can finally achieve that vision of aggregating data into a consolidated experience for the physician.

A big part of what we do is clinical decision support so while I don’t need more information, I need to know. I need to do the right thing without missing something about a patient with that level of workflow.

Q. A number of companies are in the RPM space and approaching it from their unique vantage points. But the central message is the same — It’s the big use cases in chronic disease management, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, etc., where they collate data from the points of care through sensors, devices, monitors and apply intelligence on it to intervene. But where they differ is in the kinds of target markets they’re in. Is there a sweet spot today, or do they organically find the traction which makes the most sense for a company in the European space?

Lucie: It depends on the problem you’re trying to solve and the segment of the market you’re trying to solve that for. My passion has been in the healthcare delivery system because my firm belief is that’s where most of the healthcare is delivered. There’s a segment of the market where consumers, payers, and employers will embrace that sort of employer-driven health care.

Certain payers do a really good job of driving case and disease management by engaging their members. However, most of us receive healthcare from a doctor who’s part of a clinic or a health system and that’s the messy part of the market. There’s this desire to go outside of that and if there’s something more efficient, then, I understand and I applaud that, the other entrepreneurs in the market. My passion though, is, we’ve got to fix the system we have because that’s the majority and that’s the way most of us receive healthcare and it’s what’s driving a majority of the costs.

Q. In terms of numbers, what are the quantifiable metrics you’re looking for? Is there a certain threshold for sharing risk? Do you put some of your own revenue at risk? Walk us through the thought process behind those transactions.

Lucie: Every client we deal with is trying to achieve two, maybe three outcomes — clinical, operational, and financial. You really get to the financial one, but you should see the clinical and operational because the challenge of healthcare delivery is—what’s the outcome I’m trying to achieve? How much does it cost me to get there?

Historically, we’ve drawn people at the problem — more nurses, more doctors, and more case managers to engage and interact with patients and that isn’t scalable or cost-effective. In 2021, we’ve had half a million people leave the healthcare workforce. You can up for people, the problem, but people can’t hire nurses — they’re not there. This emphasizes the point that the technology has to make the delivery more efficient while still achieving that same outcome for the patient, because that’s the business we’re in. And healthcare must deliver better health to the people we care for. So that’s almost assumed and the lesson I’ve learned on this journey. I came in with a clinical background thinking the measure we’re trying to change is the clinical outcome. What I’ve learned over the years is let’s all assume that we’re going to achieve that clinical outcome, but the question is, how do we get there?

Q. Currently, we’re in the midst of this great resignation and healthcare is failing just as much as any other sector, probably more so. The consumers of healthcare are also equally impacted. The pandemic has also highlighted the disparities in access to care. Can you discuss how your platform addresses social equity, health equity, disparities in access to care etc.?

Lucie: We work with many federally-qualified health centers and safety net hospitals, which are caring for those most vulnerable patients in our system who have the most barriers to care for instance – “It’s hard to get off work”; “I don’t have transportation”; “I don’t have child care”; “I may not have the level of health literacy that other patients have” etc. Then we also know that these chronic health conditions tend to over index in that same population. So, it’s a big part of our business to enable better access and enhanced standard of care to those who have the hardest time receiving care. RPM is something new to a lot of those care delivery systems and clinics, but it’s something to really embrace.

There are some challenges to that from a reimbursement point of view currently, under Medicare – federally-qualified health centers cannot get reimbursed for RPM, so, they get grants from the FCC and from other private foundations to do this work that creates a sustainability problem. That must be solved and we’re involved with many others and advocating for that.

To your point, there’s this light being shine on health equity. I’ve been involved with a group this year called the Health Equity Access Leadership Coalition, which is a lot of digital health companies coming together and asking — What are the policy changes? What are the best practices we, as technologists, must follow to ensure that we’re building solutions that don’t propagate the same problems we’ve always had in terms of equity?

Q. You referred to the Federal Grant Program last year which set aside a couple of hundred million dollars so a number of health systems were able to access it and use it constructively. What needs to happen for this to become a sustainable model for the most vulnerable populations to continue to receive the care that they need and not on a one-off basis?

Lucie: Two changes concerning the restriction – Federally-qualified health centers and rural health clinics can get reimbursed for RPM along with providers of care for any other Medicare beneficiary and then, get the alignment of state Medicaid plans. It is a state-by-state kind of a hodgepodge right now, whether Medicaid reimburses because RPM is currently, on-ramp. We’ve got to give these organizations some runway — a couple of years of reimbursing them and giving them a financial model that works to deliver care in this way—is possibly how we can transition them to value-based capitated or tight contracting models. But we’ve got to give them some time to really build the systems and the people in the processes to do that.

Q. What are the big trends in digital and virtual care models for the coming year? Can you share some of the goals for your company?

Lucie: On the trends, you’ve touched on a lot of it. Health equity is on top of everybody’s mind. While it’s going to continue to be so, we must ensure that we’re being inclusive. How should these programs be designed and offered to patients so that they’re accessible? This hybrid model of care is here to stay. And how is that related to value-based care?

The Biden administration’s been looking at value-based care again, so what will be the next iteration of that value-based care 2.0? I think, hybrid models of care will be a big part of that. It’s how we get there because we’re really not there at scale one accountable care or any of that versus where I think a lot of us want it to be.

Our goal is to continue to grow. We certainly are focused on continuing to grow in this segment around community health centers, FQHCs and others and working out the sustainable model with then going forward. On the technology side, at the end of day, we are a technology and a healthcare company. So we’re really pushing forward with some exciting new things such as, FHIR advances, CDS hooks advances — all of that technology and really staying on the front-edge of that.

Q. The last two years have been huge for digital health funding. Are you an institutional funded company yet?

Lucie: We are. That’s probably part of our journey in 2022 as well as the next level of funding.

Q. What do you make of the 5000 or so companies that have been funded so far? Are you seeing any trends in terms of either breakout companies that are really making a big difference or a shakeout at the other end and everything in between? What are your thoughts on this whole explosive landscape of digital health farming seen this year? Will we end it at 20 billion, give or take?

Lucie: I think the factor there is sort of the sustainability issue. You’ve mentioned this huge number of companies that have been funded, yet, the market needs sustainable solutions, not all these point solutions. We’ve seen some consolidation this year, and that’ll continue, going forward. Some of the smaller point solutions will be aggregated into larger platform-based solutions. That’s been part of our journey over the last year and why we’ve moved from originally being focused on one disease state to multi-disease state to now outside of the chronic disease phase — because that’s what the market wants. So I think that’ll be some of the shakeout — what gets rolled-up and what doesn’t survive because it was a great technology that the health system didn’t want an app for.

We hope you enjoyed this podcast. Subscribe to our podcast series at  www.thebigunlock.com  and write to us at  info@thebigunlock.com

Disclaimer: This Q&A has been derived from the podcast transcript and has been edited for readability and clarity

About the host

Paddy is the co-author of Healthcare Digital Transformation – How Consumerism, Technology and Pandemic are Accelerating the Future (Taylor & Francis, Aug 2020), along with Edward W. Marx. Paddy is also the author of the best-selling book The Big Unlock – Harnessing Data and Growing Digital Health Businesses in a Value-based Care Era (Archway Publishing, 2017). He is the host of the highly subscribed The Big Unlock podcast on digital transformation in healthcare featuring C-level executives from the healthcare and technology sectors. He is widely published and has a by-lined column in CIO Magazine and other respected industry publications.

Healthcare and health outcomes must become more accessible and equitable for everyone, regardless of their backgrounds.

Season 4: Episode #106

Podcast with Cynthia Brandt, President and CEO, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health (LPFCH)

"Healthcare and health outcomes must become more accessible and equitable for everyone, regardless of their backgrounds."

paddy Hosted by Paddy Padmanabhan
To receive regular updates 

In this podcast, Cynthia Brandt, President and CEO of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health shares her passion for giving back and encourages others to do so with their financial support, time, and expertise. The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health unlocks philanthropy to transform health for all children and families.

With the exceptional team at the Foundation, Cynthia wants to channelize philanthropy to healthcare to improve health for all children and mothers in the Bay Area, California, and eventually across the world. She acknowledges the benefits of telehealth and digital health in the wake of the pandemic and shares their digital priorities for 2022.

Cynthia encourages everyone to see themselves as philanthropists. She suggests why empathy and commitment are necessary when leveraging science to help heal humanity and elevate a community and the population equally. Take a listen.

Please visit here to get involved in Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health. 

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Show Notes

00:51Tell us a bit about your background, how you got into the Foundation and its affiliation to Stanford Medicine.
03:32Can you talk about the business of philanthropy and what it looks like for your mission at the Foundation?
09:01Tell us about the Foundation’s work and the different aspects of Children's health that you focus on – in Bay Area and globally.
15:27 What does the Foundation do for kids with special needs?
17:51 How has the pandemic changed the way you focus or approach the Foundation's mission? What are your priorities for 2022?
20:03 Some of your programs are now actually being delivered through a digital modality. Can you talk about that?
24:30 If someone wants to get involved in the Foundation's work, what should they do?

About our guest

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Cynthia Brandt was thrilled to join the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health as president and CEO in 2018. Now she is on a mission—with the outstanding team at the Foundation—to unlock philanthropy to improve health for all kids and moms, in Silicon Valley and around the world.

During 20+ years in fundraising and communications, Cynthia has contributed to important missions and great teams as Campaign Director for the Smithsonian Institution, VP for Advancement at Mills College, and Associate Dean for External Relations at Stanford University’s School of Humanities & Sciences. She is grateful and motivated to give back because others’ generosity allowed her to pursue a PhD and MA in sociology at Stanford and a BA in English and fine arts at Vanderbilt.

Cynthia is passionate about the potential for science to heal humanity and the planet. She is emphatic that this work must be grounded in empathy and a commitment to lift up all people equally.

About the host

Paddy is the co-author of Healthcare Digital Transformation – How Consumerism, Technology and Pandemic are Accelerating the Future (Taylor & Francis, Aug 2020), along with Edward W. Marx. Paddy is also the author of the best-selling book The Big Unlock – Harnessing Data and Growing Digital Health Businesses in a Value-based Care Era (Archway Publishing, 2017). He is the host of the highly subscribed The Big Unlock podcast on digital transformation in healthcare featuring C-level executives from the healthcare and technology sectors. He is widely published and has a by-lined column in CIO Magazine and other respected industry publications.

The Healthcare Digital Transformation Leader

Stay informed on the latest in digital health innovation and digital transformation.

The Healthcare Digital Transformation Leader

Stay informed on the latest in digital health innovation and digital transformation.

The Healthcare Digital Transformation Leader

Stay informed on the latest in digital health innovation and digital transformation.